A Partial Revolution: The Diplomatic Ethos and Transparency in Intergovernmental Organizations

Author(s): Roberts, Alasdair

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Abstract The World Trade Organization and other intergovernmental organizations confront a crisis of legitimacy that is partly rooted in their perceived secretiveness. These organizations have attempted to address this crisis by promising "the maximum possible level of transparency," but in fact, the improvements have been modest. Policies regarding access to information about intergovernmental organizations' operations continue to accommodate conventions of diplomatic confidentiality. Such conventions are more likely to be breached in areas where disclosure of information is essential to economic liberalization. A true revolution in transparency would require more rigorous policies on disclosure of information held by intergovernmental organizations such as the World Trade Organization, and could be justified as a prerequisite for the exercise of basic human rights, such as the right to participate fully in the policy-making process. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]
Publication Title Public Administration Review
Publisher American Society for Public Administration
Publication Date 07/2004
URIs http://www.jstor.org/stable/3542491
http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=SerialsSolutions&SrcApp=Summon&KeyUT=000222697300004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=WOS
http://search.proquest.com/docview/197173528
Keywords Accountability
Diplomacy
Disclosure
Ethics
Freedom of Information
Intergovernmentalism
International
International Organizations
International Trade
Organization theory
Organizations
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
Political Science
Public Administration, Public Sector Accounting and Audits (H83)
Public administration
Reforms
Trade
Trade Policy, International Trade Organizations (F13)
Transparency
World Trade Organization
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