Government, Business, and the Making of the Internet

Author(s): Abbate, Janet

About this Entry
Abstract In 1969, when few commercial communications networks existed, a U.S. Defense Department research agency created an experimental system that would eventually become the Internet. Driven by both research and military considerations, the designers of the Internet created a complex, robust, and flexible system that differed in significant ways from contemporary commercial communications networks. In the 1970s and 1980s, computer manufacturers (mainly based in the United States) and telecommunications carriers (mainly operating outside the United States) vied to offer commercial network products and services, but no single company or technology was able to dominate the market, in part because computer users preferred the type of nonproprietary technical standards used in the Internet. In the 1980s, the National Science Foundation took over operation of the Internet, and in the 1990s the NSF turned over the network to private-sector operators. While the Internet has rapidly increased in scale under commercial ownership, the technology also continues to reflect the system's research origins.
Publication Title Business History Review
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Publication Date 03/2001
URIs http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0007680500075395
http://www.jstor.org/stable/3116559
http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=SerialsSolutions&SrcApp=Summon&KeyUT=000175306900005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=WOS
http://search.proquest.com/docview/274333509
Keywords Analysis
BUSINESS
Business history
Communication networks
Economic History: Transport, Trade, Energy, Technology, and Other Services: U.S., Canada: 1913- (N72)
Economics
Government agencies
HISTORY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
History
Information and Internet Services, Computer Software (L86)
Information systems
Innovation
Internet
Inventions
New technology
Northern America
Scientific research
U.S
U.S.A
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