Culture and Economic Development in South Asia

Author(s): Adams, John

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Abstract The influence of culture on economic development in South Asia has drawn scholarly interest since Max Weber argued that the rise of Protestantism abetted the origination of capitalism, Weber claimed that the spirituality and other worldliness of Hinduism, along with its associated caste system, were not compatible with this new economic constellation. This sharp dichotomy posited by Weber and others has not been borne out by India's complex postindependence experience. Castes act as interest associations in India's democracy. India's labor force has become increasingly skilled and differentiated. From the Green Revolution onward, India's farmers have consistently raised yields to meet food needs. Large firms governed within joint families have succeeded in the domestic and global realms. South Asian culture and social patternings are best perceived as a multifarious resource out of which the subcontinent's future will be constructed rather than as universally stultifying features.
Publication Title Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Publisher Sage Publications
Publication Date 01/2001
URIs http://www.jstor.org/stable/1049019
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Keywords Anthropology
Asia
Capitalism
Caste
Caste Systems
Cultural Economics, Economic Sociology, Economic Anthropology: General (Z10)
Culture
Development
Economic Development
Economic Development: Human Resources, Human Development, Income Distribution, Migration (O15)
Economic development
Economics
Formal and Informal Sectors, Shadow Economy, Institutional Arrangements (O17)
India
Labour force
POLITICAL SCIENCE
RATIONALITY
Regions
Religion
S. Asia
SOCIAL SCIENCES, INTERDISCIPLINARY
Sociocultural Factors
South Asia
Spiritualism
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