A New Kind of Pilgrimage: The Modern Tourist Pilgrim of Nineteenth Century and Early Twentieth Century Palestine

Author(s): Cohen-Hattab, Kobi; Bar, Doron

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Abstract Draws on various sources to discuss the advent of modern tourism in 19th-century Palestine, comparing it to traditional pilgrimaging on the basis of five criteria defining the traveler's journey: (1) motives; (2) time during the year, duration, & travel mode; (3) religious affiliation & social background; (4) reaction to Palestine &, particularly, its holy sites; & (5) services used in Palestine. Demonstrated is the varied nature of the tourist's journey when compared to the pilgrim, despite the basic similarity of their motivation to visit Palestine: to see the holy sites. Further, the modern tourist pilgrim embodied a unique mix of secular & sacred, pursuing a holistic travel experience in Palestine & driving the development of the Middle Eastern tourism industry. 1 Map. J. Zendejas
Publication Title Middle Eastern Studies
Publisher Taylor & Francis Group
Publication Date 04/2003
URIs http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/714004511
http://www.jstor.org/stable/4284295
http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=SerialsSolutions&SrcApp=Summon&KeyUT=000182840100006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=WOS
http://search.proquest.com/docview/203255905
Keywords AREA STUDIES
Bible
Christians
Evaluation
History
Holy places
Nineteenth Century
Ottoman Empire
Palestine
Pilgrimages
Pilgrims and pilgrimages
Regional studies
Relationship
Sociology
Tourism
Tourist trade
Travel
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