The Victory of Popular Forces or Passive Revolution? A Neo-Gramscian Perspective on Democratisation

Author(s): ABRAHAMSEN, RITA

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Abstract Democratic reform in Africa is traditionally perceived as motivated by either internal or external factors. The recent trend to reduce the democratization process to simple domestic functions ignores both overt & subtle exogenous pressures, while historical efforts at describing the process as externally influenced often portray African citizens as completely passive & subject to the designs of international drives. While the internal/external dichotomy may serve as a simple heuristic distinction, it possesses little value in accurately reflecting the interaction of forces that affect the democratic process. A neo-Gramscian perspective, focused on the concepts of hegemony & passive revolution, provides one means of integrating internal & external factors: the active efforts of the national & the self-promotional agenda of the international. J. Goldschmidt
Publication Title The Journal of Modern African Studies
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Publication Date 03/1997
URIs http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0022278X9700236X
http://www.jstor.org/stable/162057
http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=SerialsSolutions&SrcApp=Summon&KeyUT=A1997WY37400007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=WOS
http://search.proquest.com/docview/196407219
Keywords AFRICA
AREA STUDIES
Africa
Democracy
Democratization
Foreign aid
Governmental reform
Gramsci, Antonio
International Relations
Interventionism
National debt
Political Change
Political Development
Political Economy
Political Science
Political Systems
Political movements
Political transition
Politics
Revolution
Social movements
Sub Saharan Africa
SubSaharan Africa
THIRD-WORLD
Transition
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